Maw-Maw Never Told Me this Happened to Her


Rachel Harmon
Student teacher with Greg English at OAK PARK MIDDLE MIDDLE 


Overview:
Hold on to your hats and prepare to travel back in time where a nation was divided by race. Prepare to experience life in time prior to the Civil Rights Movement. Who were the dominant figures during this time period? What major events happened that led up to the Civil Rights Movement? What is your role during this time? Are you an active supporter of equality? Do you wish to remain neutral during this time period? How does it affect you as a person living in this time period? Imagine that you are going back in time. During the course of this lesson you will travel back in time during the 1960’s. The Civil Rights Movement was just beginning to take place. You will participate in a Webquest, construct a personal scrapbook, and also a 2 slide PowerPoint scrapbook containing artifacts from your webquest.
Approximate Duration:  6-90 minute class periods
Content Standards:
  • History: Time, Continuity, and Change
         Students develop a sense of historical time and historical perspective as they study the history of their community, state, nation, and world.
Benchmarks:
  • H-1A-M3
         analyzing the impact that specific individuals, ideas, events, and decisions had on the course of history;
  • H-1B-M18
         discussing significant developments and issues in contemporary United States history;
  • H-1D-M1
         describing the contributions of people, events, movements, and ideas that have been significant in the history of Louisiana;
Grade-Level Expectations (GLEs):
  • Historical Thinking Skills
    Grade 7

    46. Explain the causes, effects, or impact of a given historical event in U.S. history

    (H-1A-M3)

    47. Explain how a given historical figure influenced or changed the course of U.S. history

    (H-1A-M3)
    Grade 8

    65. Analyze the causes, effects, or impact of a given historical event in Louisiana

    (H-1A-M3)

    66. Analyze how a given historical figure influenced or changed the course of Louisiana’s history

    (H-1A-M3)
Interdisciplinary Connections:  
  • English/Language Arts : Standard 5
         Students locate, select, and synthesize information from a variety of texts, media, references, and technological sources to acquire and communicate knowledge.
Educational Technology Standards:  
  • Use information, media, and technology in a responsible manner which includes following the school's acceptable use policy, adhering to copyright laws, respecting the rights of others, and employing proper etiquette in all forms of communication.
  • Use multimedia tools and desktop publishing to develop and present computer-generated projects for directed and independent learning activities.
  • Refine knowledge and enhance skills in keyboarding, word processing, desktop publishing, spreadsheets, databases, multimedia, and telecommunications in preparing and presenting classroom projects.
  • Use appropriate technology to locate, retrieve, organize, analyze, evaluate, and communicate information for problem solving and decision making.
Objectives:
The learner will….

1. Analyze important figures and their impact on the Civil Rights Movement.

2. Evaluate the significant developments and issues in the contemporary Civil Rights Movement.

3. Research specific people and events and their impact on the Civil Rights Movement.

4. Construct a PowerPoint and a hard copy scrapbook containing information and artifacts acquired during their webquest “Maw Maw Never Told Me This Happened to Her.”

Lesson Materials and Resources:
This particular lesson does not require the use of outside lesson materials. However, if extensions are used, than outside resources and materials such as textbooks, magazines, and/or other printed materials or videos may be incorporated.
Technology Tools and Materials:

Hardware:
30 computers (or enough for each student in class)

Software:
Microsoft PowerPoint
Microsoft Word
Internet Explorer

Websites:
•Webquest
      www.cpsb.org/oakparkmiddle/webquest/civil_rights.htm

Other:

Background Information:
The learner will need to know....
How to use PowerPoint and Word.
How to use the internet.
How to multi-task on the desk top.
Lesson Procedures:
Lesson Preparations:

Have a stack of playing cards presorted (one for each student). Have a small amount of “red cards” and enough “black cards” for the rest of the students.

If tables are present in the classroom, make table toppers for 2-4 of your tables. Make sure that there are equal numbers of “red cards” for the predetermined seats. The rest of the seats will equal the number of “black cards” for the remaining seats.

If desks are present choose the front row or two of desks or appropriate number of seats to be reserved for “red card holders only” seats.

Day One

1. Outside of the door tell students that you are changing seating today.
2. Hand the student a card upon entering the room.
3. Have the students take out their notes to prepare for a quiz.
4. Tell them to look over their notes. The students will complain and ask “What notes?” “What quiz?”
5. Next check students to see that they are not sitting at “Reds Card Holders Only.”
6. Ask everyone if they are ready for the quiz, when the “black card” students begin to complain, treat them with indifference.
7. Say that first the class will have a vote. I used “All those in favor of the red card students getting a candy bar raise your hand.” Of course, all the red card students raised their hands and the black card students will complain again, and again treat them with indifference.
8. Then take another vote “All those in favor of getting a candy bar, raise your hand.” When all the students raise their hands, only count the red card students’ vote. The black card students will complain, at this time you can explain that they have not passed the voting test and until they do, their votes do not count.
9. Instruct the students to take out a sheet of paper for the quiz. Remind them to put their name on their paper and number the paper 1-10.
10. When this is completed take another vote “All those in favor of getting an “A” on their quiz.” After the red card students vote in favor of an “A,” walk around and print a large A on their paper. The black card students will ask what grade they are going to receive and tell them a “D” or “F” which ever you want. The black card students will complain a great deal.
11. Now for the voting test, many different things can be used. We will use the Louisiana Declaration of Rights. Ask the black card students, whoever can recite Section 10-Right to Vote (See attached page), word for word, then explain what the section means, could not only vote, but also move up into the red student section. When they realize that no one can do this, they will begin to complain again.
12. Tell them that they will be given one more chance. Then ask them what Section 3- Right to Individual Dignity (See attached page) accomplished. Explain that even though slavery ended in 1865, Jim Crow Laws came into effect and discrimination against African American remained. Next, ask the students how they felt when they were being discriminated against. Have them brainstorm ways to combat
13. Pass out term sheet to all the students. This should be blank so that they will write in the definitions (See attached page).
14. Using Microsoft PowerPoint (See attached PowerPoint) begin to review the terms in class. The first slide of the word has just the term. Ask the students what they think the term means. Allow for response. After the term has been discussed change the slide to show the terms definition. Continue this process until all of terms have been discussed and defined.
15. If time permits pass out Civil Rights Bingo (See attached sheet). Have the students write their names on the top of the page and fill out the bingo card. Go around and initial after the squares have been filled in. This prohibits the students from changing answers. If they want to change an answer, initial the respective change.
16. Begin calling out the statements. These are designed to promote higher order thinking. It will not be the exact definition the students were given.
17. After the students receive a bingo give them a peppermint etc…

Day Two

1. After the students have completed their bell ringer (i.e. LaGumbo, Facts of the Day , D.O. L., D.O.G. or something similar etc…) have them clear their desks of everything.
2. Using PowerPoint to illustrate, tell the class the story of Emmett Till (See attached page).
3. When the story is complete turn the lights off and review the PowerPoint slides to give the students a better insight of the photos used.
4. Turn the lights back on and ask some questions about the story. These will include some simple recall and also some higher order thinking questions.
5. Have the students take out a sheet of paper and have them answer the following two questions: “Describe a time where you have been discriminated against.” “Describe a time where you discriminated against someone else.” Make sure to stress that there will be no name on the paper so it is confidential. This gives you the chance to read about what happens in their world.
6. Once the papers have been collected, spend some time introducing the WebQuest. If an infocus or other type of projection system is available, use this to display large enough for the class to see. Discuss the process of the WebQuest and the upcoming assignments. After this is done offer an opportunity for the students to ask questions about the upcoming assignment.

Pre-Lab Preparation
Have a folder on the desktop that contains the PowerPoint Guide and Word Document Guide. Make sure that printed directions for the WebQuest assignments and also a printed copy of the WebQuest address are located in the lab next to the respective computers.

Day Three (first day in the lab)

1. Assign the students to sit at computers in a boy/girl/boy/girl pattern. This helps eliminate talking during the lesson. If the monitors are turned off, have the students turn them on.
2. Have the students pull up Internet Explorer. Once the internet is up, have the students type in the web address and once the home page has come up, have the students turn off the monitor. When all of the students have turned the monitors off, begin giving directions.
3. Allow them to spend approximately forty five minutes just simply browsing the pictures and information throughout the WebQuest.
4. Once the allotted time is up, have the students stop what they are doing and access www.quizlab.com. If quizlab is not used, pass out the respective quizzes to the students. They will spend the last forty five minutes answering the quiz questions. They will be able to “bounce” back and forth between sites.
5. Five minutes prior to the bell, have the students begin to shut down the computers and bring the computer back to the desktop.

Day Four (second day in the lab)

1. Upon entering the lab, have the students sit at their same computers. They need to open the Civil Rights folder located on the desktop. Inside the folder there is a PowerPoint Guide. Have the students open up the guide. On the guide there is a place for their name, table number (optional), and hour. Have the student fill this out about both slides and when that has been completed have them turn off the monitors.
2. Once the monitors are off and all the students have filled in their name and hour on the respective slides have them go to file and “SAVE AS.” They will save it as firstname.lastname. If last name first is the preference, than modifications can be made. Do not allow the students to save it until it is been approved by the teacher.
3. After the students have saved their PowerPoint, give them directions for their PowerPoint. There is an instruction sheet located next to the computers that contains all of the information that is needed for the PowerPoint assignment. Discuss the directions before you minimize the PowerPoint.
4. After the PowerPoint has been discussed, the students need to pull up Internet Explorer. When the internet is up, have the students pull up the WebQuest. After the WebQuest is active on everyone’s computer, have the students log into quizlab and take their second set of tests. If quizlab is not used, pass out the respective quizzes for the second days journey. Be sure to instruct the students to work on their PowerPoint after the quizzes are complete. The PowerPoint should be completed at the end of the class period.
5. Make sure to have the students save their work many times throughout the class period.
6. Five minutes prior to the bell, have the students begin to shut down the computers and bring the computer back to the desktop.

Day Five (third day in the lab)

1. Upon entering the lab, have the students sit at their same computers. They need to open the Civil Rights folder located on the desktop. Inside the folder there is a Word Document Guide. Have the students open up the guide. On the guide there is a place for their name, table number (optional), and hour. Have the student fill this out and when that has been completed have them turn off the monitors.
2. Once the monitors are off and all the students have filled in their name and hour on the respective slides have them go to file and “SAVE AS.” They will save it as firstname.lastname. If last name first is the preference, than modifications can be made. Do not allow the students to save it until it is been approved by the teacher.
3. After the students have saved their Word document, give them directions for copying and pasting pictures as well as their text. There is an instruction sheet located next to the computers that contains all of the information that is needed for the Word document assignment. Discuss the directions before you minimize the document.
4. Once the document has been minimized, have the student open their PowerPoint. Have them copy the paragraph on the first PowerPoint slide and minimize their PowerPoint. After PowerPoint has been minimized, have the students pull up their document and right click and paste the text into the document. Repeat this step until all paragraphs are located in the document.
5. Have the student highlight their paragraphs and make the font size about 14 to 16 depending on the length of their paragraphs.
6. When all of the students have completed this work, have them minimize their Word document and pull up Internet Explorer. Have the students go to http://www.google.com and click on the image search. The student will then type in the name of the person they chose for their PowerPoint. Once the students have selected a photo have them double click on the photo. A new page will pull up and the photo will be thumbnail sized and located in the top left. Have the students double click the photo again and a large image will appear. The student will right click on the photo and copy. They will minimize the internet and bring up their Word document. The student will hit enter twice after their paragraphs and will right click and paste their photo. The photo will be large, but it is necessary for the scrapbook size. Have the students repeat this process until they have captured all photos needed for their scrapbook.
7. Make sure to have the students save their work many times throughout the class period.
8. Have the student raise their hands when they are ready to print. Make sure they have saved their document. Once you have approved their printouts, allow the student to print their documents. This is to be completed at the end of the class period.
9. Five minutes prior to the bell, have the students begin to shut down the computers and bring the computer back to the desktop.

Day Six (back in the classroom)

1. Pass out an index card and have the students write their postcard to a friend, relative, or Civil Rights leader. Make sure they address their postcard Dear: _____. Once their postcard has been addressed, have the students write a letter about their life during the Civil Rights Movement. (See student samples for examples). Paint this picture for the students. “Imagine that you are living during the Civil Rights Movement. When you walk outside and go about your daily life, what do you see?”
2. After the postcard is finished, have the students pull out a sheet of lined paper. On this paper have them write what they learned during the Civil Rights Movement. This becomes a type of assessment for the teacher.
3. Have the students place their sheet of 9x12 black construction paper in front of them on their table (desk) horizontal (long ways), measure off 1” (one inch) from the left side and draw a line for a binding edge. Continue this process on each of the pages.
4. Have the students write their names on white paper and cut it out and glue in the bottom right hand corner of every page. Make sure they do this in class or they will forget to put their name on all of their work.
5. Once they have placed their name on every page, give them the rest of the hour to complete their scrapbook (see attached instruction sheet).
6. Five minutes prior to the bell, have the students begin to clean up. If they are finished with their scrapbooks, have the students turn them in. Whatever is not finished is for homework. (See rubrics for grading)
Assessment Procedures:
The lesson objectives will be assessed by:
a) Rubrics
b) Quizzes (paper and/or online)
c) Observations
d) Student Feedback
Accommodations/Modifications:
Accommodations can be made for the students by allowing them to use computers or finish projects during lunch and before or after school. Based on their exceptionalities other accommodations may be necessary.
          ----- written by Rachel Harmon  

Reproducible Materials:
Explorations and Extensions:
News article on the reopening of the Emmett Till case.
Show the movie "Remember the Titans."

Lesson Development Resources:
(n.d.). Emmett till murder site bluejeans' place. retrieved Jaunary 28, 2004, from Emmett Till Murder Site Web site: http://www.bluejeansplace.com/EmmettTillMurderSite.html.

Abraham, S. (2003). retrieved February 04, 2004, from If You Were Alive During the Civil Rights Movement Web site: http://www.kn.pacbell.com/wired/fil/pages/webcivilrist.html.

Albin, K. (1996). Rosa parks the woman who changed a nation. retrieved February 08, 2004, from Rosa Parks Web site: http://www.grandtimes.com/rosa.html .

Gado, M. (n.d.). Courttv's crime library. retrieved February 14, 2004, from All about Mississippi Madness: The Story of Emmett Till Web site: http://www.crimelibrary.com/notorious_murders/famous/emmett_till/index.htm.?sect=7.
Reflections:
If anything I would say be open to modifying the lesson as you teach it. Every class has a different personality and different needs. After completing the Quests my cooperating teacher and I discussed possible minor changes which included restructuring the scrapbook using a 9x12 sheet of construction paper by folding it in half to create a 6x12 booklet. The pictures, writings, and post cards would have fit much nicer in the space provided. After the lesson was over I located a news article concerning the reopening of the Emmett Till case that would have made a nice ‘closer’ to the Quest.
Contact Information:
Rachel Harmon
rachel.harmon@cpsb.org
Moss Bluff Middle School
Additional Contacts:
Greg.English@cpsb.org,
Calcasieu Parish Social Studies Cooperating Teacher
with ITEC, INTECH, IIM, and CBT training

 

 

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